Sort

  1. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Topshop Unique Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    A palette cleanser to Spring/Summer's riotous street-inspired prints, today's Topshop Unique show looked to sensual yet utilitarian constructions of velvet, fur (faux), cotton and leather. A print seemingly inspired by the tracking points used in 3D animation travelled throughout on silk jumpsuits, knits and pyjamas with earthy tones of burgundy and khaki punctuated by black and tangerine.

  2. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Louise Gray Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    Known widely as London's most exuberant colourist, Louise Gray this afternoon showed another optical feast with glitter brocade, audible embellishments and an inspired monochrome print (featuring blocked Quick Response codes) providing just a few facets of a truly sublime collection.

  3. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Acne Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    An upright collection (enforced by leather neck braces reminiscent of Kayan neck-coils) featuring butcher's-apron patent leather in oxblood, cornflower blue and apple green was the order of the day at Acne. Closing Day 3 of London Fashion Week, the show was presented to a musical front row including Florence Welch, Mike Skinner, model-turned-musician Irina Lăzăreanu and the xx.

  4. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Pringle Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    The requisite pearls were left high and dry as Pringle designer Alistair Carr today presented a defined and modern proposal of the house's traditional codes at the Phillips de Pury gallery. Reworked kilts evolved into box-pleats racing down the back of wool coats and the original purveyor of the twinset opened its supposed buttoned-up formality through the use of sensual Georgia O'Keefe-esque draperies created by unbuttoned layers of silk. Knitwear was also explored in greater depth than last season with a finely tuned balance of the constructed and the caressing seen in rounded cardigans standing out from the body and knit dresses featuring linear arrangements of frills.

  5. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Fred Butler Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    Characteristically colourful and executed with increasingly slick craftsmanship, Fred Butler's short and sweet presentation at Somerset House's portico rooms featured intricately woven candy-hued tubing, signature origami folds and knitted gloves in a cropped-and-chubby shape we have seen on several occasions this week. Uncovered hands were themselves accessorised with carnivalesque nails by Marian Newman.

  6. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Giles Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    Burning parchment, heraldry, armour and witchcraft all played into Giles Deacon's latest collection with sumptuous fabrics and beaded embroideries all helping to create a sense of mediaeval rigour and luxe.

  7. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Osman goes oriental

    Joining a band of Easterly-facing designers growing as collections month continues, Osman Yousefzada today presented a collection that developed his trademark examinations of sculptural volumes this time through leather and Chinoiserie brocades. A distinct sense of protection, even aggression was hinted at through hoods and capes but was tempered with a more tranquil sense of sensuality and ornament in a collection both refined and defined.

  8. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Peter Jensen Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    A touching tribute to his close friend and collaborator Thelma Speirs, Peter Jensen's latest collection saw a troupe grey-bobbed models each emerge showcasing a graphic and appealing mix of shift dresses, A-line coats and shirt collars. Besides the hair, other Speirs facsimiles included headphones slung at ease around the neck and a modish mix of chic and wit.

  9. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Meadham Kirchoff's disco défilé

    To a soundtrack that included a track we have waited our life to hear at a fashion show -Mariah Carey's All I Want For Christmas- and closing with Abba's Dancing Queen, Meadham Kirchoff showed a fiesta of a collection today which just so happens to be Mardi Gras. With models racing past at a similar speed to Autumn/Winter 2011's cultish parade, the show was a brilliant blur of tinsel, disco lights, saturated tartans and sequins.

    Comments

    1. Nanank
      18:52 2 Sep 2013
      I'm going cuckoo for patless at the moment too. These photos are amazing. I'd never heard of Meedham Kirchoff until I saw a clip of them doing a Courtney Love inspired show at London Fashion Week. I can't get enough of those cutesy ice cream shades xx
    Comment
  10. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Ashish's paillettes of peace and love

    Inspired by the journey of spirituality pursued by Westerners travelling to India and back at home at festivals, Ashish's signature sequins this season explored both types of trip through rainbow flags and popping symbols from peace signs to tie-dye to smiley faces.

  11. by Ben Knight Evans .

    JW Anderson Men Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    An idiosyncratic mix of pineapple brooches, apron detailing, 'Le Coq' motifs, optical prints and a generous gloss of lacquer, the final day of London Fashion Week dedicated to menswear opened with JW Anderson's show at the old Central Saint Martins building in Holborn.

  12. by Ben Knight Evans .

    Martine Rose Autumn/Winter 2012/13

    Ahead of the MAN show from which, with this first solo collection, she has effectively graduated, Martine Rose's presentation at Somerset House's Portico Rooms featured a stream of boys (and one camouflaged girl) each filing out with rainbow-bright hair wrapped around their faces. The collection, which featured reworkings of the bomber jacket cropped, elongated and turned inside out alongside more upright and streamlined shirting and tailoring was a strong and luxurious expression of subcultural reference done in truly modern fashion.

  13. Recent comments

    1. jon.emmony
      10:58 23 Feb 2012
      That print at the front reminds me of our Perroquet project by Sølve Sundsbø...
    2. alex.fury
      16:00 23 Feb 2012
      Had your head in the archives for too long young Emmony.
    Comment
  1. Page 8 of 9
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. 9