Sort

  1. by Niamh White .

    Gallerist Bill Powers speaks to us for In Your Face at EDITION Hotel

    In our latest In Your Face interview, gallerist Bill Powers speaks frankly about trying to disrupt what he feels is a general dumbing down of culture: 'Everything produced now is aimed towards the mentality of a 15 year old boy... There is a widespread lack of the patience that you need to develop appreciation for things that might be an acquired taste. There's a mentality that if you don't have an immediate number one hit, that you're washed up. And that bleeds over into all arenas of culture.' Which seems odd, when you consider the same man was on the bill of judges in Bravo's recent show Work of Art - a two season series that could be described as the art world's answer to the X Factor. It would be very easy to condemn him at this point. If he's searching for a means to encourage meaningful thought on a large scale, then why engage with a television programme that reduces artistic practice to a series of challenges, rejections and finally a grand prize short cut to celebrity. Yet, I wonder if his effort to 'make everything elitist' is tied up with more of a general respect for the masses and an effort to elevate the language of mainstream culture. 'The winner's work was inspired by Ai Wei Wei's imprisonment, that fact that you see a political dissident in China on a channel that also shows the New House Wives of New Jersey felt fun, like you were sneaking something past the network.'

    He's aggressive in his opinion that the art world is not inherently intimidating and steadfast in putting the onus of the individual to engage with it, 'it's more that people lack the drive, curiosity or proactive spirit to engage. It is a false narrative to say that the art world is impenetrable.'

    You can watch the interview now on SHOWstudio alongside conversations with Hans Ulrich Obrist, John Pawson, Marc Quinn and Aaron Young all recorded at EDITION Hotel at Miami Beach.

  2. by Niamh White .

    Ryan Gander's In Your Face interview is up!

    Ryan Gander is the latest artist to join our series of In Your Face interviews. He speaks openly to Carrie Scott about the commercial aspects of Art Basel from EDITION Hotel Miami Beach, comparing its buying attendees to 'a feeding frenzy of vampires.' Gander is already on record  critiquing the work of many of his contemporaries, 'art with stars, diamonds, palm trees, skulls, smileys, any emoticon. That’s what everyone seems to be interested in, daft cliches with no real meaning, depth, integrity or conceptual rigour.' In our interview he goes further, 'Half of the art world use basic signifiers and lack basic literacy.'

    In contrast to the individuals he's referring to, Gander purposefully evades any kind of stylistic signature. It is very difficult to say 'that is a Gander' and often the work defies commodification altogether. Instead, he operates within a dialectic of story telling or folkloric traditions. Archaically, oral communication served as a means to make sense of the seemingly inexplicable forces of nature and offered a method of both counsel and remembrance. They gave communities a tool to help retain myths and legends, educate their members in certain skills and trades, and offer moral guidance. In contrast to a printed book, the spoken story has the capacity to be moulded around the concerns and interests of its audience. While fixed narratives were often maintained, storytellers might adopt a regional dialect, address a particular local issue or simply apply a new perspective to each tale according to the concerns of his or her listeners. The tools that are fundamental to oral recitation, such as gesture, speed, intonation, accent, and dramatisation, lend the tales that are told a malleable quality. Through accent inflection, break and breath, each story readily embraces and nurtures the mystical, the impossible and the anarchic, and presents a living and vibrant continuum for the passing along of knowledge. Integrating the attributes of oral traditions and spoken word into artistic practice is a means by which to push back against the frequently sterilising nature of the white cube and it seems that this is the realm in which Gander operates.

    Watch his fascinating interview now, only on SHOWstudio.

  3. by Niamh White .

    Marina Abramovic joins us for an In Your Face interview

    Performance artist Marina Abramovic is the latest creative to join us for an interview from EDITION Hotels Miami Beach. The series released this week has been revelatory in a number of ways. The careful composition of each shot frames each sitter in a crop that presents their portrait as a landscape. The severe black and white grade means that each subject's thought can be traced across the plane of their face. In our interview with Abramovic, her sense of control over her own image is more apparent than in our previous interviewees. Unsurprisingly I suppose, she is deadly still and with an unfaltering gaze to camera.

    Abramovic addresses the big questions. She speaks of her Baltic obsession with death, recounting the way in which her grandmother selected the clothes she would wear when she passed away and when she was buried. It was present in every day life, in the act of living. Having attended Susan Sontag's funeral, which she described as 'lousy', Abramovic went directly to her lawyer to ensure hers did not suffer the same fate. In the interview, she reveals the terms she specified in the contract, including the places (there will be 3 Marinas buried), the dress code and even the music that will be played. Anthony and the Johnsons are on the bill- they don't know it yet but she's quite sure they wouldn't say no. More seriously, she defines the three things she would like to avoid in death, 'I do not want to die angry, I do not want to die in fear, and I want to die consciously.' She switches deftly between playful humour to absolute profundity repeatedly.

    Abramovic's purpose is clear, 'I have been very lucky to have a strong sense of mission throughout my life. I want to lift human spirit and change consciousness- it's an incredible motivation.' This is an intelligent and unmissable interview, don't miss it. 

  4. by Niamh White .

    Artist Pedro Reyes talks to us about the political agency of art

    Continuing the notion that art should be useful, advocated by Hans Ulrich Obrist in an In Your Face interview earlier this week, we have just released a conversation with artist Pedro Reyes in which he talks about the social and political capabilities of his practice. Reyes has just opened a new iteration of his piece Sanatorium at Art Basel Miami Beach. Originating in the Guggenheim and then re-staged at documenta 13 and at the Whitechapel gallery in London last year, the piece combines theories of psychology with theatre, performance and fine art to offer a re -thought blend of therapy to visitors. Reyes explains that it is 'a performance piece where members of the public are invited to come to the gallery and speak to perfect strangers as though they are therapists. In pieces like Sanatorium, it is the participants who bring the narrative.'

    Reyes work continually seems to allow either his participants or his objects to undergo redemptive transformations. Whether it is turning automatic guns into musical instruments, creating a Peoples United Nations to address world problems through role play or presenting a cricket burger (the Grass Whopper) as an alternative to mass meat production, his artworks are imbued with his radical optimism, and indeed not just a little humour.

    In our interview, Reyes' is realistic about this optimism. He reveals the reservations he sometimes feels about the actual capabilities of art to instigate positive social change whilst simultaneously resolving these by saying 'Everything changes the world, whether it's action or in-action'. And he is gaining traction in applying his ideas to government policy. Currently he is attempting to pass a nationwide disarmament campaign to turn weapons into instruments across Mexico. If that isn't an example of art having direct and political impact, I'm not sure what is. 

    The interviews will continue to be released today and tomorrow. Look out for Ryan Gander, Martin Creed and Marina Abramovic, all coming up.

     

  5. by Niamh White .

    Hans Ulrich Obrist for In Your Face

    Hans Ulrich Obrist is a curator who has dedicated his life to the service of art, and he speaks vividly with Carrie Scott in our latest In Your Face interview from EDITION Hotel at Miami Beach.

    To say that the pool of reference that Obrist draws from is vast, is a broad understatement. Yet where some might claim sole authorship of their projects, he repeatedly identifies and names those who have inspired, challenged or changed his thinking. He references his early alignment with artists that, like him, have gone on to establish meaningful and long careers such as Christian Boltanski, Hans-Peter Feldmann, and perhaps most importantly Fischli and Weiss. In our newly released interview with the curator, he said 'I was born twice, once in Zug in '68, and then I was born again in '85 at Fischli & Weiss' studio.' This encounter is widely documented. The pair were creating their now seminal piece The Way Things Go and their advice seems to have helped Obrist define his purpose, 'To be useful to art.' It also marked the moment that saw him begin to take night trains across Europe to museums, galleries and artist studios that would feed his relentless curiosity and begin his chosen path.

    His projects take many forms, from the Nano Museum that was a portable frame to be filled with art that was eventually lost by Douglas Gordon in a pub in Glasgow, to the endless recordings of multiple conversations - including the centenary project where Rosemarie Trockel encouraged him to speak with artists approaching or exceeding 100 years of age or the instructive exhibitions Do It that are have been staged in more than 120 countries. And that's not to say he hasn't curated solo and group shows too, it just usually means that they find new ways to create a monograph or meanings, new formats that enable the artist and activate the artwork.

    The projects themselves are fascinating, but it's the trains of thought, the encounters and the journeys that lead to their realisation that is the real illumination. Obrist reveals these in a fast paced, encyclopaedic rendition of his life in this interview. Watch it now on SHOWstudio.

  6. by Niamh White .

    Our interview with artist Marc Quinn for In Your Face is up

    Artist Marc Quinn is the latest interviewee to be a added to our In Your Face series. We're shooting in EDITION Hotel at Miami Beach through Art Basel with some of the most influential figures in the art world.

    In the interview, Quinn speaks at length about negotiating 'the narrow spectrum of what is considered to be beautiful and what can be beautiful.' This is explicitly relevant to his work with Alison Lapper (8 Months), the monumental marble that featured on the Fourth Plinth in London and was later re-envisioned as an inflatable sculpture for the London Paralympic Opening ceremony and later shown at the Venice Biennale Foundazione 2013. It belongs to a body of work that was inspired by the fragment room in the British Museum. Quinn talks about feeling troubled by the contradiction that these broken and fractured sculptures presented. As revered artworks, they are considered sublimely beautiful while literal bodies that take these forms receive a different reaction. It provoked him to create the series of immaculately finished marble sculptures of these very physicalities, those that are not ordinarily in the realms of visibility, let alone immortalised in stone. Interestingly, he also speaks about his sculptures depicting Kate Moss in yogic poses as an anathema to these works. Instead, we have supermodel as deity, celebrity as our gods and goddesses; 'They are the rocks on which people wreck their lives in striving for perfection.'

    Quinn's self assurance in the interview is resolute. He's said it before and he says it again, Self, the cast of his head in his own blood, is according to him 'Rembrandt re-done by Beckett' and later he reveals 'Inspiration can come from anywhere, my mind latches on to certain things, works around my subconscious and emerges as a pearl.' It is rare and fascinating to hear how the artist views his work both in the present, fleeting moment, and also how it might exist in the longer scheme of things- to those not yet born, to those who won't encounter him.

    It's not to be missed, and it's up now. More in depth interviews will be released throughout the week as part of our In Your Face series from EDITION Hotel at Miami Beach.

  7. by Niamh White .

    Architect John Pawson discusses his brand of minimalism from EDITION Hotels

    In our latest In Your Face interview, John Pawson spoke to us about his architectural practice and working on his latest project with EDITION Hotels alongside Ian Schrager at Miami Beach.

    The designer talked about the path he's taken. He joined architecture school later than most, and confesses to being being too impatient to finish the course so instead left early to pursue what he really wanted to do. And he's done it well. Pawson's brand of minimalism is a study in light. Streamlined shapes, formulaic decoration and clarity are his defining features, saying 'I create rigorous simplified spaces to appreciate where space and light come from'. It seems his rigour is panoptic, and he doesn't go easy on his clients, 'The architecture demands that people modify the way they live. It is calming but also stimulating.'

    A nice aside was a revelation on letting his guard down and using photography as a therapy 'I travel, and life passes so quickly. If I take a photograph, it feels as though I have captured that moment. But of course, that's rubbish.'

    Watch the interview in full now on SHOWstudio. Later today we're releasing conversations with Marc Quinn and Hans Ulrich Obrist.

  8. by Niamh White .

    Aaron Young is our latest interviewee for In Your Face

    In our latest In Your Face interview, Aaron Young speaks with Carrie Scott about his artistic practice. Young is the epitome of the artist as celebrity. Google his name and it isn't art works you find but reems and reems of paparrazi shots of him on the red carpet. But he warned us not to have pre-conceived ideas, the work is his main concern. From rationalising his practice as being between the peripheries of painting and performance to considering what art should really be, Young engages with both the machismo and the malleability of his work.

    He is arguably best well known for the Burnouts, a series of spectacular happenings where he asked a number of motorcyclists to ride around on aluminium with their wheels lined with paint, until their tyres literally burn out or until they can't see. As the smoke emits from the engines, they in turn erase the marks made by the tyres. It's a play on action painting that is presented in a number of guises. Young elaborates on the act of making as being a performance in itself, the resulting artwork, both in its entirety and later as divided pieces, and of course the documentary film and photography footage of the event.

    He also has some strong opinions on his work Four Dots in the Painting, Close Your Eyes and Tilt Your Head Back saying, 'you can see a painting by closing your eyes and what you see - whether it's Jesus, John Lennon or Dash Snow - depends on your constitution. It is called an elliptical burn.' The action here is a contradiction in turn, you close your eyes in order to see, and what you think you see is determined by your frame of reference. In the interview, Young revels in recounting a Peruvian maid who encountered the work and had to be taken away by an ambulance because she thought she saw God, 'That's what art should do', he said. Part tongue in cheek, part bravado, it seems Young is at once playing a joke on us, and deadly serious.

    Unsurprisingly, Young cites Rauschenberg's Erased De Kooning (1953) as pivotal in the development of his thinking and it is clear to read how the multiplicity of that piece is tied up with his work- the erasure as creation, a monochrome non image residue covering the picture plane, perhaps even the machismo oedipal act of overthrowing one's authority figures. The interview is live now, and definitely worth watching in the light of Young's new show with Kukje Gallery.

    SHOWstudio are continuing to interview artists from EDITION Hotel Miami Beach throughout Art Basel. Up next is Hans Ulrich Obrist…

  9. by Niamh White .

    SHOWstudio's interview series 'In Your Face' kicks off at EDITION Hotel

    This week, SHOWstudio has taken up residence at EDITION's new hotel in Miami to continue our interview series In Your Face. With the art world descending on Miami Beach for Art Basel, we're putting creative visionaries under the spotlight in a series of challenging conversations that reveal the intricacies of their respective practices. Visually conceived by Nick Knight, each subject is captured in a beautifully composed but intensely cropped frame that focuses directly on the face. Every expression, blink, twitch, thought and recoil will be revealed in what Knight describes as a 'living portrait.'

    The interviews began this morning with a candid talk with EDITIONS' own Ian Schrager. He spoke about his tumultuous career path from comparing his first venture Studio 54 as 'Frankenstein's monster', to describing his ethos for creating lived in space saying, 'Our agenda does not start with design, it starts with social science'. He also reveals the advice he would give to his younger self. The interview will go up on SHOWstudio tomorrow, Thursday 4 December and the series continues throughout the week with luminaries such as Marina Abramovic, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Martin Creed. In the meantime, you can watch our other In Your Face interviews with Vito Acconci, Dinos Chapman and Bernard Henri Levi.

  10. by Niamh White .

    Christopher Orr's Monkey Portait

    This wonderful portrait of a monkey by artist Christopher Orr will feature in Anj Smith's SHOWcabinet exhibition at SHOWstudio. We open to the public on Friday 21 November so come and see it at 19 Motcomb Street, London then!

  11. by Niamh White .

    Anj Smith: Echo, 2014
    Limited edition etching available now

    We're currently installing the upcoming Anj Smith exhibition at SHOWstudio and, among an array of awe inspiring items that are gradually coming in, we have received this beautiful etching Echo from the artist. It is the first edition to be made by the painter in 10 years, and we're releasing it to mark the opening of the show. It's an extremely limited run, and it's available now.

    The show opens next Thursday 21 November at 19 Motcomb Street, and then runs through until 27 February 2015. Don't miss it.

    Image: Anj Smith, Echo, 2014, Zinc on etching paper, Edition 10/10 + 2AP, 12.7 x 16.2 cm / 5 x 6 3/8 inches, Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth, Photo: Todd-White Art Photography

  12. by Niamh White .

    Marie Schuller shoots 3D printed dress for Venice Architecture Biennale

    Today we're shooting with our contributing head of fashion film Marie Schuller. Commissioned by the London College of Fashion in response to Rem Koolhaas' Venice Architecture Biennale, the film has been a collaboration between Schuller and MoMu curator Kaat Debo. It features a 3D printed dress that has been created by Tobias Klein, Alexandra Verschueren and Joris Debo at Materialise. The film will be released on SHOWstudio on 6 November 2014 alongside three others as part of the upcoming 1914 Now project.

  13. by Niamh White .

    Iris van Herpen x Dom Perignon launch in London

    Iris van Herpen's designs are often poetic meditations on materials in a state of flux. From capturing the finest drops of a splash of water wrapping around the body, to interrogating the poisonous beauty of refinery smoke or mining the dynamic forces of repulsion and attraction between magnetic forces, her garments interrogate the behaviour of the elements, often following them through a transition between two absolutes. It is not surprising then that she was selected to collaborate with Dom Perignon to mark the end of their Vintage 2004, and the 'rebirth' of its Second Plenitude as P2- 2004.

    Van Herpen responded to Dom Perignon's 'Metamorphosis' with a sculpture that was revealed last night at Hus Gallery in London. Concealed within a black lair, she presented the Cocoonase. Speaking of the piece, she said “The name Cocoonase references the butterfly which softens her cocoon shell before she goes into her next stage of metamorphosis. This piece of art houses Dom Pérignon Vintage 2004, symbolically nestled inside of the cocoon structure, and its fine ribs and lines represent a one-way passage out. Cocoonase acts as a shield that protects the Dom Pérignon bottle as it prepares for its metamorphosis.”

    Appearing at first be a solid titanium shell or fossilised trilobite, the piece began gradually to undulate, as though breathing. It was was submerged in ferrofluid, a black liquid that can be manipulated when exposed to strong magnetic fields so that the sculpture's tendrils would spontaneously and randomly ripple. The effect was an uncanny Kafkan creature existing in a constant state of liminality, anticipating its eventual emergence.

    If you have the chance, seek this sculpture out.

  14. by Niamh White .

    Coming soon: Anj Smith SHOWcabinet exhibition

    © Anj Smith, Apparatus, 2012, Oil on linen, 42.8 x 38.6 cm/ 16 7/8 x 15 1/4 inches
    Collection: Amrita Jhaveri. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

    SHOWstudio is delighted to announce that our upcoming exhibition is with painter Anj Smith. Opening 21 November 2014, the painter will create a 'wunderkammer' spilling with the vestiges, mementos, relics and artefacts that combine to inform her meticulously executed worlds.

    Anj Smith's paintings do not succumb to easy categorisation. A single golden hair painted minutely, is as likely to appear as a rock face hacked from crude impasto slabs. While the composite elements in her works are not inherently magical or fantastical in themselves, when piled together in sheer layers of paint, they acquire a mystic quality as though extracted from hallucination, intoxication or psychosis.

    Smith's painting Apparatus (2012) marks the centrepiece of the exhibition. Ethereal, androgynous and with rouged lips, her sitter's pallid complexion and soft features are crowded with facial hair, dark eye circles and blue veins. Smith's muse is exquisitely attired and has seemingly constructed an armoured veneer from found debris. Embroidered drapery is ornamented with obscure embellishments that have possibly been sourced from the surrounding wilds. Wriggling beetles and insects have been clumsily stitched into place alongside grasses, a jewelled Chanel brooch and a bonzaied corpse flower. Clawing bats nest in the hair amongst feathers, fauna and shells that are lodged precariously into place.

    Smith's cabinet features a wide array of objects that have served as a reference point for her work. Richard Dadd's handwritten manuscript The Elimination of a Painter and its Subject-called the Fairy Feller's Master Stroke details the schizophrenic 'spirit' inspiration he received whilst recovering in Bedlam. Plant-inspired relics from Mediterranean temples jostle with antique pearls. 17th century Mughal masterpieces are juxtaposed with a capsule library and glittering figeater beetles fossilised in 70's neon perspex. Detritus, Smith's 2009 Liberty print, also features, alongside Philip Treacy's intricately hand carved Chinese Garden headdress and Yoshiki Hishinuma's waxed plastic wind coat. Amongst objects lent directly from Smith's studio are grains of Stromboli's black volcanic sand, a  skull found on the Isle of Mull and a treasured painting of a monkey.

    Smith will also release a limited edition etching to coincide with the opening of the show. The exhibition opens 21 November 2014 and runs through until 27 February 2015. Don't miss it!

     

  15. by Niamh White .

    Noritaka Tatehana LiveStudio marks opening of our SHOWcabinet exhibition

    To celebrate the launch of his SHOWcabinet exhibition this week, Noritaka Tatehana will take up residence at SHOWstudio on 9, 10 and 11 September 2014 to create a pair of his vertiginous heel-less shoes during a live broadcast. Revealing his process for the very first time, the shoemaker will give a step by step demonstration of the techniques used to create his gravity defying designs. Viewers of the stream can submit questions directly to Tatehana through SHOWstudio.com, so whether you want to know which university he went to, what he's inspired by or how he came to be the shoe designer of choice for Lady Gaga and Daphne Guinness, now is your chance to ask. When the shoes are complete, Nick Knight will shoot them on Daphne Guinness, a longterm champion of Tatehana, in a finale that marks the opening of the exhibition. The shoot will result in a series of editorial images and a fashion film that depicts Tatehana's latest creation.

    The live studio kicks off tomorrow, 9 September, from 14:00 - 18:00. Submit your question to Noritaka Tatehana now!

  16. by Niamh White .

    Charles Jeffrey draws Grace Wales Bonner's CSM graduate collection

    SHOWstudio friend and collaborator Rei Nadal introduced us to the wonderful artist Charles Jeffrey. He illustrated the Spring/Summer 2014 haute couture collections for SHOWstudio capturing gowns from Jean Paul Gaultier to Maison Martin Margiela through a series of abstruse, colourful drawings on found detritus, torn paper and even his own chest. Jeffrey has now depicted the CSM graduate collection of Grace Wales Bonner in these fantastic illustrations. Ethan O'Connor writes about them here:

    'Afrique. C’est chic. Ideas of African masculinity and its trans-Atlantic mutation is the basis upon which Grace Wales Bonner made her A/W14 collection. Depicted through Charles Jeffrey’s elegantly scratchy illustrations, the graduate collection that gained notoriety for its multi-layered approach to wearability is now translated by Jeffrey for SHOWstudio. Figures in flares amidst sandy smudges, flowery cutout borders and scanned plastic wallets combine “art materials” with visually stimulating primitivism. The setting of Bonner’s collection was a landscape which provided the flamboyance of 1970’s black dress, with the attitude of artists like Kerry James Marshall and Samuel Fosso, a hybrid of West-African ideas about being male. Noticeably, the inspiration of Jean-Michel Basquiat flutters above the heads of the illustrated models. Jeffrey’s clever, Crayola-esque idols in their mohair suits and beaded bags allow us to absorb a welcome, refreshed image of Bonner’s vision.'

    View more of Jeffrey's artworks on SHOWstudio now.

  1. Page 1 of 5
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5