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  1. by SHOWstudio .

    Kristen McMenamy talks Ruth Hogben!

    Today, 30 July, we are launching the next segment of Subjective, a series of interviews conducted by Nick Knight to unravel the history of contemporary fashion photography from the perspectives of models. This week’s interviewee is Kristen McMenamy, who sits down with Nick Knight to discuss working with fashion filmmaker Ruth Hogben on a film presentation of Gareth Pugh’s Spring/Summer 2011 collection in lieu of the traditional catwalk show. 

    ‘I could express myself in a better way than I could in still photography,’ says McMenamy. ‘Ruth created drama, amazing drama, and still showed the fashion. That blew me away.’ Knight and McMenamy go on to discuss the future of image making, and whether film will become the predominant medium to display fashion. 'When Vogue first started using fashion photography in 1910, there were only two fashion photographers that did it for fifteen, twenty years,' Knight points out. 

    Watch this candid interview now, and be sure to watch Ruth Hogben’s next fashion film - created as part of the Ugly series - launching this Friday 1 August! 

  2. by SHOWstudio .

    Dirty Girls!

    We're very pleased to launch a new essay in our rolling Ugly series, by none other than our own editor Lou Stoppard. Stoppard's take on the theme revolves around 'Dirty Girls' - visions of dishevelled, unkempt and unwashed femininity.

    Exploring attitudes to dirt, decay and womanhood from as far back as the 13th century, Stoppard focuses on the visual horror of death, the connections between physical dirtiness and imorailty as well as perceptions of the women who use a grubby appearence as a tool to assert their own autonomy and sexuality.

    'Poise and purity have long been associated with prettiness and with that passivity and traditional, regressive femininity. To be beautiful one must be ordered and proper. Like Kate Middleton. Dirt suggests activity, agency and autonomy,' Stoppard states.

    In particular, Stoppard's essay cites Dirty Girls, an amateur documentary short (and now Youtube cult) that examines as its subjects a group of girls in high school known for their grubby appearance. As she points out, 'The shock of their fellow pupils mirrors the outrage that has always surrounded unkempt women.'

    Delve into the fascinating essay now, and stay tuned for the release of Ruth Hogben's fashion film at the end of the week!

     

  3. by SHOWstudio .

    New fashion film coming soon!

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    We're excited to announce a new fashion film coming soon! Nick Knight has teamed up with Levanna McLean, also known as 'IfThisIsLev' on YouTube. McLean uses the video sharing platform to release videos of her dancing to soul music, thus earning the affectionate nickname 'Northern Soul Girl'. For this fun fashion film, Mclean will be wearing clothes selected by acclaimed stylist Katy England. More information to come soon!

    While you wait, head over to Mclean's YouTube channel to watch her twirl and groove, and check out Nick Knight's Fashion Mix featuring his favorite soul tunes! 

  4. by SHOWstudio .

    Listen to Liam Hodges' Fashion Mix!

    Fashion Mix alert! SHOWstudio invites fashion’s elite to compile a playlist of their ‘greatest hits’ to celebrate the link between music and fashion. Our mixes feature designers, models, journalists and photographers, and this week’s playlist is curated by designer Liam Hodges! Take a listen to avant-garde hip hop with Death Grips, Flatbush Zombies and Ratking, fitting perfectly with Hodges’ design aesthetic.

    Stay tuned for more Fashion Mixes, and browse through our current collection!  

  5. by SHOWstudio .

    Liberty Ross and Nick Knight reminisce about working for Dior!

    Today, we are launching the next segment of Subjective, a series of interviews conducted by Nick Knight to unveil the history of contemporary fashion photography from the perspectives of models. This week’s interview is with Liberty Ross, who sits down with Nick Knight to discuss working together on this sensual and provocative Dior Addict campaign. 

    Knight explains why he chose this photo, citing Ross' ability to ‘twist and turn [her] body and to maintain the believability in the expression and to be able to be so provocative and still stay within the beauty and elegance’. Ross continues, ‘It’s a journey you go somewhere mentally, your body does things you never believe possible… I’m prepared to go the full. Whatever it takes.'

    Watch this candid interview now and stay tuned for more, rare Subjective interviews! 

  6. by SHOWstudio .

    New work from Joseph Lally

    Today, 22 July 2014, we are premiering a new fashion film series by filmmaker Joseph Lally! The Beauty series features eight episodes shot in Lally’s signature raw, dystopian and gritty style and focueses on ‘the fashion industry and its dependence on the objectification of beauty.' Each episode stars a different model, starting with the great Daphne Guinness

    Watch the eight-part series now and take a look through the archives for Lally's past work, including films Death Camp, Earth Magic, The Murder of Jean Seberg and the Soap Opera series. 

  7. by SHOWstudio Shop .

    CFconcept jewellery now available to purchase!

    CFconcept Jewellery by Danish actress turned designer Charlotte Flyvholm is now available to buy through SHOWstudio Shop! We are stocking CFconcept's Klint necklaces, Aura rings and midi rings, so make sure you visit SHOWstudio Shop now to shop the elegant collection.

    In an interview with Flyvholm, she stated: 'I create jewellery for women who want to enhance their qualities. I want to make women feel beautiful and unique filled with confidence and joy. The focus is on high quality and innovative design...'

    Shop the CFconcept collection through SHOWstudio Shop.

  8. by SHOWstudio .

    Polly Brown: Plants

    London-based photographer, artist and SHOWstudio friend Polly Brown has just launched a new book of photographs! Plants documents the vibe in the offices of high-profile brands and fashion companies through portraits of the office vegetation, from cactuses at Diesel to HBO's orchids. SHOWstudio even features in the book, with a nod to Nick Knight's well-documented floral fascination!

    The work was designed and editioned by Brooklyn-based independent publisher Pau Wau and contains a foreword from Eden Project founder Sir Tim Smit. Green friends from Vogue,
 The New Yorker, Celine,
 Google,
 Paul Smith, Disney, Acne,
 The Wall Street Journal, BBC, Playboy and Moët
 are all featured.

    There's more about Plants on Brown's website and you can buy the book here!

  9. by SHOWstudio Shop .

    Coming Soon! CFconcept at SHOWstudio Shop

    CFconcept Jewellery by Danish actress turned designer Charlotte Flyvholm will be coming soon to SHOWstudio Shop. Flyvholm's collection combines her influences from around the world - including the Middle East, South-East Asia and the Americas - with her Danish roots and her love for Scandinavian design. 

    Flyvholm founded CFconcept after a kite-surfing accident left her house bound for months in 2010. Inspired by sketches from her adventures abroad, she began to draw and model jewellery designs. SHOWstudio Shop will be stocking CFconcept's Klint necklaces, Aura rings and midi rings - make sure you visit SHOWstudio Shop next week to shop her wearable collection.

  10. by Calum Knight .

    SuicideYear

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  11. by SHOWstudio .

    Listen to Tigran Avetisyan's Fashion Mix!

    We’ve got a hot new Fashion Mix! SHOWstudio invites fashion’s elite to compile a playlist of their ‘greatest hits’ to celebrate the link between music and fashion. Our mixes feature designers, models, journalists, and photographers, and this week’s playlist is curated by designer Tigran Avetisyan! Take a trip back to the seventies with Pink Floyd, ABBA and Eddie Vedder. While you listen, take a look at Avetisyan’s designs in SHOWstudio shop

    Stay tuned for more Fashion Mixes, and browse through our current collection! 

  12. by Calum Knight .

    Chynna - Glen Coco

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  13. by SHOWstudio .

    Listen to Lou Stoppard's Fashion Mix!

    We have a new Fashion Mix! SHOWstudio invites fashion’s elite to compile a playlist of their ‘greatest hits’ to celebrate the link between music and fashion. Our mixes feature designers, models, journalists and photographers, and this week’s playlist is curated by our very own Lou Stoppard! Dance away to the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s, Pulp, Depeche Mode and more. 

    Stay tuned for more Fashion Mixes, and in the meantime, browse through our current collection! 

  14. by Niamh White .

    Upcoming exhibition: Noritaka Tatehana

    SHOWstudio is delighted to announce our upcoming SHOWcabinet exhibition is devoted to Japanese shoe designer Noritaka Tatehana and launches on 10 September 2014. Lauded as one of the most important shoe designers of our time, Tatehana mines Japan's vast cultural heritage to produce shoes that re-think the very notion of the 'high-heel'. Favoured by Lady Gaga and Daphne Guinness, his soaring heel-less shoes shift the wearer's balance forward onto the toes and are elaborately adorned using avant-garde techniques that have emerged out of a mastery of traditional Japanese crafts.

    Tatehana draws particular inspiration from the 'Oiran', a group of visually alluring courtesans that were present in Japan's tea houses during the vibrant Edo and Meiji periods. For these figures, appearance was paramount. Their delicately embroidered kimono, elaborate make up, towering geta shoes and mother of pearl hair pins created a veil through which to seduce their clientele. Each piece of apparel was crafted with the finest and most intricate means and each accoutrement demanded the heights of artistry.

    For Tatehana's SHOWcabinet exhibition, the designer will showcase his proficiency in these traditional crafts and demonstrate the ways in which he has incorporated them into the realms of contemporary high fashion. The display will include shoes, garments, sculpture and painting that employ the arts of katazome, katakana and yuzen, in surprising and innovative ways. It will also feature new work by the artist Taisuke Mohri, whose photorealist portraits embrace both eastern and western motifs, and embrace the hybrid sensibility of Tatehana's work.

    Prior to the exhibition opening, Tatehana will take up residency at SHOWstudio to create a new pair of heel-less shoes. He will demonstrate the intimate making process of his signature design during a live online broadcast. The exhibition will also mark the debut launch of Noritaka Tatehana's range of leather accessories.

  15. by SHOWstudio .

    Katharine Grace and Krishna Godhead's couture collection
    Watch the show video

    Watch the Katharine Grace x Krishna Godhead couture show exclusively on SHOWstudio!

    We just finished rounding-up the A/W 14 couture season with the help of Alexander FuryCharlie ByrneJess Hallett and Claudia Croft. But for those not yet ready to say goodbye to haute couture, we're excited to launch the show video from the Katharine Grace x Krishna Godhead collection!

    Hailing from Perth and both former models, the design duo showed in Paris for the first time this season. Their collection entitled La Haine ('hatred' in English) was presented more as a theatrical performance than a runway show in front of an audience of 100 invited guests. 

    Watch the captivating film and take a look at the beautifully executed sketches of the Collection featured in the show notes. 

     

    Recent comments

    1. lrks99
      18:58 17 Jul 2014
      What an amazing Collection one of the best iv seen in a while!!! Just Stunning!
    2. Bronwyn Kershaw
      06:17 23 Jul 2014
      Congratulations to the young man who did the drawingsof the clothes for Katharine and Krishna. His name is Lance Zealand Kershaw Ladu.
      Also Comgratulations to Katharine and Krishna on your Collection.
    Comment
  16. by Niamh White .

    Niamh White on Abramovic and adidas

    Marina Abramovic is an artist that courts adoration and disdain simultaneously. While her current exhibition 512 Hours at the Serpentine gallery in London has received rave reviews, her recent collaboration with adidas on their All in or Nothing World Cup campaign has been the subject of some scrutiny. This and her high profile associations with celebrities like Gaga, James Franco and Jay-Z jar, for some, against the academic and critical work that she continues to amass.

    Abramovic’s artistic career spans over 40 years. She began performing in 1973 in Serbia, and over a short time became fully immersed in what was a highly political medium. Much of the performance art of the sixties and seventies developed as a reaction against a number of factors- art institutions' involvement in the Vietnam war, the commodification of art, discrimination and elitism in the gallery and museum systems, as well as widespread gender inequality. Abramovic, both individually and in her collaborative work with Ulay, contributed considerably to this movement and has continued to tirelessly expand the field where others fell away from it.

    Part of this has been to establish an archive for performance. Now the self professed 'grandmother of performance art', Abramovic has witnessed the turbulent reception and treatment of the medium throughout her career. The eighties heralded a certain amnesia that somewhat sidelined the performance art of the previous decade as an extreme reaction to an extreme time and it was largely replaced by an influx of painting and sculpture. The inevitable commercialisation of performance art took place. The editioning of documentary film and photography became the means by which these works were eventually transitioned into the market place. Theoretically, performance has also been continually re evaluated. The primacy or authenticity allocated to encountering the 'original' performance has been undermined as fallacy and the audience's original reception of the work is thought to be as mediated as any resulting footage or commentary. And so questions arise as to how to archive this medium without stagnating it. How to engage with the debate and enliven it. How to remember without assimilating into systems to which performance artists were so vehemently opposed.

    Abramovic is tackling these questions. Her performance Seven Easy Pieces at the Guggenheim in 2005 saw her re-stage key performances from the 70's including Acconci’s Seedbed, Valie Export’s Action Pants: Genital Panic and Joseph Beuys' How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare. Each performance was revived in a different guise, finding relevance in a new time and living on through the flesh of their latest performer. The Marina Abramovic Institute is another step towards this. It is a centre in Hudson, New York that aims to be a home for long durational performance work. The artist came under fire for crowd sourcing the funding to open the museum, with the implication being that she was wealthy enough to fund it herself. But I'd challenge the mentality of this. By opening up the ownership of the institution and naming the contributors as founders, Abramovic undermines the very nature of an 'institution' and the hierarchy inherently associated with it. Her many founders feel an ownership and a belonging. They have an opportunity to engage with the space and shape the activities that are happening there. Abramovic is building a participatory and active community.

    Marina Abramovic's collaboration with adidas is the latest project to incite confusion and some derision within the art press. It is a commercial for a pair of trainers, but it's a cerebral one. The artist takes the opportunity of the World Cup- a global phenomenon that engages more of the world's population than almost any other event, and harnesses that community to introduce them to her craft. During the film, Abramovic explains the performance in a very accessible and clear voice over. She gives the context of the piece and details regarding its relevance, drawing on the parallels she finds between performance art and sport. The message is unabashedly positive, encouraging us to find strength in togetherness, commitment and perseverance. Amidst a sea of advertising that is seemingly hell bent on both overtly and subliminally bashing our self esteem into submission, this campaign is a welcome relief.

    This project and the others like it, introduce performance art to the masses and explain why it might have some application for people outside of the contemporary art sphere. This is an essential activity if the medium is to maintain the momentum it has gathered and create it's own history.

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