Amy de la Haye

Professor

Amy de la Haye is Professor of Dress History & Curatorship at London College of Fashion (LCF), University of the Arts London: her roles include serving as joint director (with Judith Clark) for the research Centre for Fashion Curation at LCF, teaching on the MA Fashion Curation programme and supervising text and practice-based PhD students. From 1991-1999 she was curator of 20th century dress at the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A). She has also worked with fashion designer Shirin Guild. She studied at Brighton University and the Royal College of Art.

De la Haye has curated and co-curated around 35 exhibitions. They include: Streetstyle: From Sidewalk to Catwalk (V&A 1994-95); The Cutting Edge: 50 Years of British Fashion (V&A, 1997), One Woman’s Wardrobe (V&A, 1998); Catherine Walker: A British Couturière (V&A, 2002) Fashion & Fancy Dress: The Messel Family, 5 Generations of Fashion (Brighton Museum, 2005); Cinderellas of the Soil: The Women’s Land Army (Brighton Museum, 2009), Gluck: Art & Identity Brighton Museum, 2017). Each has accompanying books and Gluck was nominated for the Times Literary Supplement as one of the books of the year. She also curated Coco Chanel: A New Portrait by Marion Pike, 1967-1971 (London, Milan and Washington DC).

She is curator of The Violet Hour (2014), a short film produced by film-maker Katerina Athanasopoulou, as part of Alison Moloney’s 1914-Now project, which can be viewed on SHOWstudio.

De la Haye writes for Fashion Theory and her published work includes books on the Lucile and Worth archives, Chanel, London Couture (all V&A Publications), Exhibiting Fashion: Before and After 1971 (Yale University Press). She is also author of the V&A’s Clara Button books for children.

De la Haye's next exhibition is called Ravishing: The Rose in Fashion at the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology, New York (opening 11 September 2020), which is accompanied by a book of the same title (published by Yale University Press, September 2020) that includes ‘A Conversation on Roses’ with Nick Knight.

Amy de la Haye is Professor of Dress History & Curatorship at London College of Fashion (LCF), University of the Arts London: her roles include serving as joint director (with Judith Clark) for the research Centre for Fashion Curation at LCF, teaching on the MA Fashion Curation programme and supervising text and practice-based PhD students. From 1991-1999 she was curator of 20th century dress at the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A). She has also worked with fashion designer Shirin Guild. She studied at Brighton University and the Royal College of Art.

De la Haye has curated and co-curated around 35 exhibitions. They include: Streetstyle: From Sidewalk to Catwalk (V&A 1994-95); The Cutting Edge: 50 Years of British Fashion (V&A, 1997), One Woman’s Wardrobe (V&A, 1998); Catherine Walker: A British Couturière (V&A, 2002) Fashion & Fancy Dress: The Messel Family, 5 Generations of Fashion (Brighton Museum, 2005); Cinderellas of the Soil: The Women’s Land Army (Brighton Museum, 2009), Gluck: Art & Identity Brighton Museum, 2017). Each has accompanying books and Gluck was nominated for the Times Literary Supplement as one of the books of the year. She also curated Coco Chanel: A New Portrait by Marion Pike, 1967-1971 (London, Milan and Washington DC).

She is curator of The Violet Hour (2014), a short film produced by film-maker Katerina Athanasopoulou, as part of Alison Moloney’s 1914-Now project, which can be viewed on SHOWstudio.

De la Haye writes for Fashion Theory and her published work includes books on the Lucile and Worth archives, Chanel, London Couture (all V&A Publications), Exhibiting Fashion: Before and After 1971 (Yale University Press). She is also author of the V&A’s Clara Button books for children.

De la Haye's next exhibition is called Ravishing: The Rose in Fashion at the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology, New York (opening 11 September 2020), which is accompanied by a book of the same title (published by Yale University Press, September 2020) that includes ‘A Conversation on Roses’ with Nick Knight.

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