Farfetch Partners with Thrift+ to Make Unwanted Clothing Donations Easy

by SHOWstudio on 9 October 2019

Farfetch and Thrift+ team up to allow Farfetch customers to easily donate clothes they no longer use.

Farfetch and Thrift+ team up to allow Farfetch customers to easily donate clothes they no longer use.

Online luxury fashion site Farfetch and charity secondhand clothing resale platform Thrift+, have teamed up to allow Farfetch customers to easily donate clothes they no longer use, and encourage consumers to make sustainable purchases - hopefully helping to tackle the shocking statistic that 300,000 tonnes of unwanted clothes are thrown out each year.

For those who are aware of the need to shop sustainably but just haven't quite got around to eBaying / Depopping / listing things on Vestiaire Collective, this is a smart solution. Unwanted clothing donations will be collected, listed and resold by Thrift+, with the proceeds being split three ways: a third to a charity of your choice, a third to cover Thrift+'s collection costs, and a third returned to you as Farfetch credit. Alternatively, customers can choose to forgo Farfetch credit and donate all the money, less Thrift+ costs to their nominated charity. Thrift+ supports donations to any of the 160,000 registered charities in the UK.

Susie Bubble - Image courtesy of Farfetch.

Director of Sustainable Business at Farfetch, Thomas Berry said: " "We know our consumers would like an easy way to clear their wardrobes of unused items, and at the same time, they would like to feel positive about it. Thrift+ x Farfetch links our customer base with an innovative service that improves the donation experience and has a positive impact by giving good quality clothes another useful life and supporting multiple charities. This is a natural extension to our Farfetch Second Life resale programme, focused on luxury handbags, and part of our broader approach to sustainability.”

Image courtesy of Farfetch.

Clearly the efforts of climate campaigners like Extinction Rebellion and Greta Thunberg are starting to take effect, as fashion brands and designers coming up with innovative responses to the current environmental crisis. In the last two months for starters, Gucci have announced they will be going carbon neutral, while emerging London designer Caitlin Price and her sister Emily have founded a new line, 3AM Eternal, which repurposes vintage garments.

Image courtesy of Farfetch.

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