Björk

Musician

Björk engages with and influences almost every form of contemporary visual and musical culture. She studied music from an early age, made her first album at the age of eleven and formed several punk bands before forming The Sugarcubes in 1987. When they split in 1992, she went on to collaborate with Nellee Hooper on Debut, a distinctive and highly successful solo album, which was followed by Post in 1995 and the bolder, more experimental Homogenic in 1997. In 2001 Vespertine marked her departure from collaborative work towards what she describes as a more 'curatorial' and 'adult' approach.

Björk is committed to working with cutting edge practitioners and has collaborated with fashion designers Alexander McQueen and Hussein Chalayan, photographers Nick Knight, Stephane Sedanoui and Nobuyoshi Araki, the filmmaker Chris Cunningham and musicians Tricky and Evelyn Glennie, among many others. In 2000, she was awarded Best Actress by the Cannes Film Festival jury for her role in Lars Von Trier's controversial film Dancer in the Dark, which itself received the Palm D'Or. Bjork collaborated with her husband, performance artist Matthew Barney, on the film project Drawing Restraint 9.

In May 2010, Björk was awarded the Polar Music Prize from the Royal Swedish Academy of Music alongside Ennio Morricone. On 20 September 2010, Björk performed her version of ‘Gloomy Sunday’ at designer Alexander McQueen's memorial in St. Paul's cathedral in London. On 7 December 2010, a previously unreleased song, called 'Trance', was released by Björk as the backing track of a short film made by Nick Knight, titled To Lee, with Love, as a tribute to McQueen, with whom Björk collaborated on multiple occasions.

In 2015 New York's MoMA hosted a retrospective exhibition that chronicled Björk's career from Debut to Biophilia. Björk launched Björk Digital in June 2016, a virtual reality exhibit showcasing all the VR videos completed for her album Vulnicura thus far. Björk Digital has travelled the world with stops in London, Montreal, Houston, Los Angeles and Barcelona.

Björk engages with and influences almost every form of contemporary visual and musical culture. She studied music from an early age, made her first album at the age of eleven and formed several punk bands before forming The Sugarcubes in 1987. When they split in 1992, she went on to collaborate with Nellee Hooper on Debut, a distinctive and highly successful solo album, which was followed by Post in 1995 and the bolder, more experimental Homogenic in 1997. In 2001 Vespertine marked her departure from collaborative work towards what she describes as a more 'curatorial' and 'adult' approach.

Björk is committed to working with cutting edge practitioners and has collaborated with fashion designers Alexander McQueen and Hussein Chalayan, photographers Nick Knight, Stephane Sedanoui and Nobuyoshi Araki, the filmmaker Chris Cunningham and musicians Tricky and Evelyn Glennie, among many others. In 2000, she was awarded Best Actress by the Cannes Film Festival jury for her role in Lars Von Trier's controversial film Dancer in the Dark, which itself received the Palm D'Or. Bjork collaborated with her husband, performance artist Matthew Barney, on the film project Drawing Restraint 9.

In May 2010, Björk was awarded the Polar Music Prize from the Royal Swedish Academy of Music alongside Ennio Morricone. On 20 September 2010, Björk performed her version of ‘Gloomy Sunday’ at designer Alexander McQueen's memorial in St. Paul's cathedral in London. On 7 December 2010, a previously unreleased song, called 'Trance', was released by Björk as the backing track of a short film made by Nick Knight, titled To Lee, with Love, as a tribute to McQueen, with whom Björk collaborated on multiple occasions.

In 2015 New York's MoMA hosted a retrospective exhibition that chronicled Björk's career from Debut to Biophilia. Björk launched Björk Digital in June 2016, a virtual reality exhibit showcasing all the VR videos completed for her album Vulnicura thus far. Björk Digital has travelled the world with stops in London, Montreal, Houston, Los Angeles and Barcelona.

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